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Gamification As the Holy Grail of Engagement?

Before I start my enthusiastic ramble about gamification, let’s make this reading experience a little more fun. As you will be going through this article, you will come across several spelling errors. Don’t panic, these were made on purpose. When you think you have them all, post your wild guess in the comments. We will reveal the exact number of the mistakes together with naming who are THE MASTERS OF SPELLING by the end of this week.

What is gamification?

 

Now, let’s get back to business! So, what is gamification?  There are numerous definitions all over the Internet, but basically gamification is the use of game design and game elements in non-game environments.

This definition includes several words that deserve a bit more attention. The first one is GAME.  Everyone knows what a game is and everyone has played at least one but not many people are able to define it. Games are fun, engaging, social…right?

Let’s have a look at what other clever people say about games:

  • “A game is a series of meaningful choices” – Sid Meier
  • “A game is a domain of contrived contingency that generates interpretable outcomes.” – Thomas Mallaby
  • “A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude.” – Jesse Schell

Now, that sounds like a lot of different opinions. To water it down, every game has:

  • a set of rules that lay down some boundaries to the gaming experience
  • clear goal that is meaningful for the players
  • lusory attitude -  e.g. voluntary overcoming of unnecessary obstacles

Although every game has rules, it also gives plaeyrs enough freedom to achieve the game’s goal in their own unique way. This makes them feel like their choices in the game are meaningful and that they are in control of the experience.

If you look at Jesse Schell’s definition, you can see the problem-solving aspect of games.  However, not every game has to include complicated puzzles to be fun.  There are different kinds of games that bring different kind of fun experience,  e.g. easy fun (blowing out steam), hard fun (challenging), people fun (interact with others), serious fun(meaningful).

The key is to understand your player and design the game in such a way that it works for them. Not you.

Why are games fun?

The second term is GAME ELEMENTS. These are the little bricks that help you to build your gaming experience. These can be:

  • Points
  • Badges
  • Levels
  • Avatars
  • Quests
  • Progress Bars
  • Social graph
  • Leader board

…and many more. Game elements are graet for making a business system more game-like and can also get across your brand identity in a very subtle way (design of badges). Nevertheless, using these elements doesn’t make your gamified system a success! So, if you think that you will throw some points and badges at your players and they will automatically engage with your brand, think again! The game is NOT about the elements only. It’s about understanding your players and their motivations and creating a game experience, a narrative, that uses game elements in a balanced and meaningful manner.

Games are about experience and narrative.

The third word is NON-GAME ENVIRONMENTS.  Simply said, it’s any environment that’s not actually a game. There are three basic categories of non-game environments:

  • External (for example, consumer engagement)
  • Internal (for example, HR activities)
  • Behavior change (for example, lose weight, be more eco friendly)

So, now that we have all the basics down, we can focus on gamification itself and what it can do for your business. Based on everything that was said above, it is quite obvious that gamification might help you to increase players’ engagement with your brand, shape behaviours, or colect large amount of data about your stakeholders’ behaviours.

To explain how it works in reality, let’s look at Nike+.

Nike+ screenshot of gamified system

Nike + gamified system

First, the goal or motivation for people to engage with this system is not to buy more Nike products but something that is important for them: geting healthy, losing weight, training for a half marathon.

Secondly, the system is built on a strong feedback scheme. You get all the data:

  • on what you did (run 5km)
  • what is your progress (you are getting faster/run longer or further)
  • what are the goals you have set for yourself (run a half-marathon in 5 weeks)
The system is also quite social as you can share your progress with friends, team up with them, or compete against them.

 Screenshot of Nike+ gamified system

The game elements that you can spot throughout the systems are mostly badges and points. However, these are just little things that compliment the whole gamiffied picture. The main focus remains on people’s motivations and giving instant feedback that makes them feel like they are making progress and keeps them engaging with the system.

Nevertheless, what works for Nike+ may not work for you. Whatever you want to gamify, you have to stop thinking like a business and start thinking like a game designer. Not like a player, a game designer. Why? If you want your gamified system to be at least a bit successful it cannot be developed around you, or your brand, but around your players.

Before you start you need to be aware of:

Motivation

– do you derive value from encouraging behaviour?

– what may be the players’ motivations – teamwork, creativity, unique skills, mastery etc.

Meaningful Choices

– does your game offer interesting  and meaningful activities?

The Google News badges are probably one of the best examples of meaningless choices and useless gamification system. You get badges for reading news and if you read a lot of news about sport, you get a sport badge! I doubt that people start reading sport news just becuase of one meaningless badge.

Google News using badges

Structure

– can desired behaviours be modelled through algorithms? (typically a digital system)

Potential Conflicts

– can the game avoid tension with other motivational structures?

Surprise, surprise, gamification can be demotivating if used in the wrong context. For example, if you offer people money as a reward for suggesting a particular product to their friends they will be less likely to do so even if they though the product was really good. Reason for that is simple, it is not longer about the product but about the money.

Designing games is players

If you have ticked all the boxes, you can start designing your gamified system. All you need to remember are those 6 Ds:

1. Define business objectives

2. Delineate target behaviours

3. Describe your players

4. Devise activity loops

5. Don’t forget the fun!

6. Deploy the apropriate tools

Pretty simple, right? At least in theory.  This is just a very, very basic introduction to what gamification actually is. There are many things that can help you to design a perfect gamified system such as motivation and behavioural theories. Hopefuly, I have intrigued you enough to set off your own quest to become the gamification expert!

And don’t forget to post your guess about the number of spelling errors in this post!

 

 

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  • http://blog.medialab3dsolutions.com/ MediaLab3DSolutions

    Great read Petra! And our guess on the number of spelling errors is 10.

    • http://twitter.com/Opelova Petra Opelova

      Thank you! Really glad you like it! :)

  • Chris

    12?

    • http://twitter.com/Opelova Petra Opelova

      You are really close Chris. ;)

  • Ruth Streder

    Love your post Petra, really interesting. I counted nine spelling mistakes, but there might be more – I am running low on my early morning coffee! :)

    • http://twitter.com/Opelova Petra Opelova

      Thanks Ruth! Running low on coffee in the morning is never a good sign. But a great guess nonetheless! ;)

  • Joanna Berger

    Nice read, Petra. My guess would be 11 errors plus one space missing :)

    • http://twitter.com/Opelova Petra Opelova

      Thank you Joanna! :)

  • http://twitter.com/ted_malone Ted Malone

    Great post Petra. I count 8 spelling errors, a couple of made-up words (I.e. gamified), a couple of Queens English words (modelled & behaviour) and 3 incorrect spellings due to grammatical errors (not & compliment) and at least one word pairing that should have been hyphenated. :-)

    • http://twitter.com/Opelova Petra Opelova

      Thanks Ted! What a great and detailed reply! Love it! :)

  • Veronika Dlouha

    12 or possibly 13, depending on whether you count “eco friendly” as a mistake when there is no hyphen :)

  • http://twitter.com/terrylawlor Terry Lawlor

    Hi Petra, I counted 14? Terry.

  • http://twitter.com/Opelova Petra Opelova

    Thank you so much for playing the game! I hope you had as much fun finding the mistakes as I had making them. :)

    Now it’s time to answer the big question: How many errors are there? The full list is:

    1) plaeyrs – players
    2) graet – great
    3) eco friendly – eco-friendly
    4) colect – collect
    5) geting healthy – getting healthy
    6) compliment – complement
    7) gamiffied – gamified
    8) becuase – because
    9) modelled – modeled
    10) they though the product was … – thought
    11) not longer – no longer
    12) apropriate – appropriate
    13) Hopefuly – hopefully

    Which means we have two winners who both spotted the intentional 13 mistakes. The MASTERS OF SPELLING are: Ted Malone and Veronika Dlouha.

    Congratulations Ted and Veronika and thank you everyone for playing!